Author Topic: hey everyone! grinding question....  (Read 3950 times)

WolvenGoth

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
hey everyone! grinding question....
« on: August 24, 2006, 09:41:25 AM »
i recently purchased a 72 beetle with autostick.  i'm trying to get her back on the road, but have a few kinks left to work out.  one of which i'm hoping you guys can give me some help with...

i drove the car once down the street and back and she did fine, the brakes aren't good enough to drive more than a block or two tho.  when driving she shifted fine.  HOWEVER, when standing still she likes to grind when i try to put her in gear.  not always, but most of the time.  i think part of the problem is my engine idle is set too high, i'm having trouble getting it to go into the 800-950 range without either getting really rough, or dying.  i have a 34 pict 3 carb, and a svda distributor that i'm not sure what it is exactly.  it is a bosch i know.  i replaced the points and condesner which made my dwell reading get steady, before the meter was fluctuating everywhere.  so i thought when i did that i'd be able to get the rpms down, but it didn't, turning the big screw all the way in doesn't do it.  i do think my timing is a little off, but i have to wait til atleast next friday when i get paid (not tomorrow, a week from tomorrow) before i can buy a timing light.  

anyhow back to the autostick issue, does my theory that a higher than normal idle make the car think it's unsafe to switch into gear hold true?  it makes sense to me, but i'm not certain.  also i read you need to clean the switch under the gearshift, which i'm attempting to do right now, but gonna look over that page again cause i'm not certain what all has to come loose, i also noticed cip1 sells the wire switch thing.  my wires look old and weathered, and i'd almost bet the PO's didn't clean that thing every 10k kilometers like this site suggests.  does anyone have pics of what to clean, if i can get it apart hopefully it will be self explanitory, but im more of a visual person so seeing it would help greatly.

i also have a LOT of play in the gearstick, dunno if this could contribute to grinding or not.

the one time i tried to drive it, as mentioned before, it shifted fine while moving, but when i came to a stop to turn around and come home, it took a min to get it in gear.

i flushed out the ATF best i could, and i topped off the gear oil in the tranny, tho i dont think it actually needed any, most of what i squirted in ran right back out.  i'm waiting on a transmission gasket to come from cip1 so i can change the fluid, cause mine doesn't have the drain plug, so i have to take the pan off and hope i can get it to drain out of a corner.(how inconvenient)  the ATF was really nasty, like black almost with just a hint of the red it should be, the gear oil, i can't get my finger too far in the hole, but what i got on my finger tip before i topped it off looked almost good as new.  is there a site that has a bunch of pictures of maintenance procedures?  i have heard the bentley is a must have for the autostick user especially, but money is tight so i haven't gotten one yet, i might can get one this coming check, but needing the timing light i may have to wait another 2 weeks...  any help is much appreciated, and thanks in advance as always.  i'm really looking forward to gettin my 2 pedals on the road, just don't totally know what it could be if it isn't the idle or that contact.  thanks everyone!
-WolvenGoth

bookwus

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 339
    • Email
hey everyone! grinding question....
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2006, 12:10:02 PM »
Hiya Goth,

Welcome to the group!  Before we go any further, do know that this is THE site for AutoStick info.  There are a lot of good folks here who have tinkered their way into a lot of AS knowledge.  There are also good technical "lifts" of info that can temporarily take the place of a Bentley, although you do need to get your hands on a Bentley ASAP.  By the way, go to Amazon.com for the best Bentley prices - should be around $28.00US.

Your questions...........

"does my theory that a higher than normal idle make the car think it's unsafe to switch into gear hold true?"

No.  The car does not have the ability to think in the sense that we use that term with modern cars.  The driver can shift into another range with no regard to RPM.  Of course, the driver will wind up paying the consequences if he does so injudiciously.

"is there a site that has a bunch of pictures of maintenance procedures?"

Not that I've seen.  Again, this site will be your best source for additional (to your soon to be purchased Bentley) AS info.

"just don't totally know what it could be if it isn't the idle or that contact."

Well, do know this............shifting in an AutoStick is electrical function with the assist of a vacuum system.  Consequently, almost all shifting problems (one rarely needs to break open the actual transmission case in an AS) can be found in the electrical system [shift lever through control valve solenoid] and/or in the vacuum system [intake manifold through control valve to clutch servo and including the vacuum reservoir tank].  My bet would be that your problem can be solved/fixed by attending to these two systems.

And........definitely change out that ATF.  And smell it while you're at it.  From your description, it sounds as if it might be burnt.  If so, it will have a burnt smell to it.  That could be a indicator of bad things to come, but keep your fingers crossed, these AutoSticks are really pretty hardy.  

In the meantime, check out this article I wrote a few years back for another website....................

Trouble Shooting an Auto-Stick
A Little Background
Prior to the Auto-Stick, Volkswagen had marketed a wholly mechanical semi-automatic transmission in Europe called the Sax-o-matic (also referred to simply as a Saxomat). Encouraged by the response of customers in Europe and with an eye on the increasingly upscale market in the United States, VW began development of an improved semi-automatic transmission in the mid sixties. VW introduced its Automatic Stickshift transmission in 1968. It was available in Standard Sedans, SuperBeetles, and Karmann Ghias throughout its production run (until 1975).
The Nature of the Beast
Basically, the Auto-Stick allows for driving without the necessity of shifting gears, as in a manual transmission. For that matter, many trips may be made without shifting of any kind. However, it is not an automatic transmission in the sense that term is used today. Technically, the Auto-Stick is a dry-clutch, three-speed, semi-automatic transmission which makes use of a torque converter.
The driver, unemcumbered by a clutch pedal, has the option of going through the gears as one would with a manual transmission; Low, First, and then Second. Shifting occurs by simply moving the shifter to the desired position while easing off the gas pedal. Or the driver could simply leave the shifter in First for around town driving. Although the start off the line is slow, the driver even has the option of setting the transmission in Second and leaving it that range as he drives.
The shifting pattern is in a typical three-speed "H" format. Upper left is Reverse, lower left is Low, upper right is First, and lower right is Second. Reverse, as with all VW transmissions of the day has to be depressed to engage.
VW refers to the AS shifter positions as "ranges". Low range is designed for starting off under a load or uphill. First range accommodates most around-town type of driving speeds up to approximately 45 MPH. Second range is the choice for highway driving speeds.

Checking Out the Auto-Stick
Shifting gears in an Auto-Stick is an electrical operation accomplished with the aid of a vacuum assist. There are many individual components to the vacuum assist system, such as the hoses, clutch servo, control valve, and vacuum tank. This being the case, it is almost always a good idea to troubleshoot the vacuum system first when something goes wrong.

The Vacuum System
Leaks anywhere in the vacuum system can result in symptoms such as poor (slow or jerky) shifts. Actually, the vacuum hoses and their clamps should be replaced on a regular basis (like every 10,000 miles). So, look the hoses over carefully for signs of wear or cracking. Also check to see that the hoses are keeping their natural shape; which is to say......not collapsing. Hoses in the vacuum system should be wire-reinforced. Replacement hosing can be obtained at a local hydraulics shop. Also while doing this inspect the clamps and be sure they are tight.
This is also a good time to thoroughly examine your vacuum tank (under the driver's side rear fender) for leaks. It is prone to gravel spray
from the rear tire. Lastly, in doing a "vacuum check" take a good look at the control valve and the clutch servo. The control valve is not likely to be leaking (although that is a possibility) but may need to be adjusted. See any good manual (Haynes or Bentley. Having at least one of these manuals is an absolute necessity.) for this procedure.
Be sure that the vacuum hose from the control valve to the carburetor is hooked up to the proper vacuum nipple on the carburetor. That nipple (and its source) should be above the butterfly for proper shifting action. This would be an excellent opportunity to remove the control valve air filter and clean it out. Another chore to do while you're back in this area is checking the Automatic Transmission Fluid level in the ATF reservoir. The ATF dipstick is built into the reservoir lid which can be found on the right hand side of the engine compartment. The fluid should be checked while warm, but the engine should not be running.
The Clutch Servo
The clutch servo may well be where you are experiencing any possible leaks. Check it carefully to see that it holds a vacuum. To check the servo for leaks, remove the vacuum hose from the control valve where it attaches (the vacuum opening) to the servo. Move the clutch arm toward the rear of the car so that the servo's internal bladder is pulled out of its resting position and fills the servo with air through the vacuum opening. Place your thumb over the vacuum opening and observe the bladder action through the holes on the side of the servo. If the bladder deflates, you have a leak. Replacing a clutch servo is rather common in an Auto-Stick with more than a few miles on it. Rebuild kits are readily available and of reasonable cost. The only real hassle involved with the clutch servo is its location, which is just above the left heat exchanger. To remove or adjust the servo, youšll likely have to remove that heat exchanger first.
If the servo bladder holds a vacuum in the test above, your servo is airtight, but may need to be adjusted. Actually, what is really adjusted is the clutch free play. This can be accomplished by following the directions (you'll have to make a gauge too - the directions for that are in the manuals also) in either Bentley or Haynes. Should you find that you cannot adjust the clutch free play "out" any more, you will have to remove the engine and replace the clutch. However, do know two important facts about the clutch before you go tearing into it. The clutch disc and pressure plate have a remarkably long lifespan in an AutoStick. I have pulled apart OEM clutch assemblies in cars with way more than 100,000 miles and thirty years and the components were still in very good working order. Can the clutch wear out or go bad? Certainly! But the odds against it are on your side. The other thing you should know about the clutch assembly is a bit more somber. The parts inside the bellhousing are extremely difficult to find. Impossible is more like it in certain cases. Bear that in mind as you get into the clutch assembly.
The Electrical End
So, let's say your vacuum checks out. Next, try the electrical end of all this. Your shifter has a set of points within it. Normally the action of moving the shifter will cause the contacts to touch and complete the circuit to the control valve. When these points make contact the Auto-Stick can do its job and the driver is able shift the transmission. Poor contact or no contact is going to result in gear gnashing and other assorted transmission horrors. So you'll need to check out the condition and the gap of your shifter points. Again, a good manual can instruct you in this procedure.
While you're down there adjusting the points, trace that blue wire coming out of the bottom of the shifter. It should lead back under the rear seat to a connector. Because this connection leads back to the control valve, it must have a solid contact at this point, so check that out. But you're not finished here. Back in the engine compartment (usually in the upper left hand corner near the coil) you'll find two in-line fuse holders. One of those fuse holders governs the back-up lights. The other one, which will have a lead connecting to the solenoid on the control valve, transmits power to the control valve. Check to be sure that this fuse is in good shape and its contacts are clean.
It would also be a good idea to get a continuity checker and check out the electrical switches (the neutral safety switch and the ATF temperature switch) on the transmission itself (they're over on the passenger side of the tranny behind the right heater box head).
Something Else
If everything mentioned so far checks out well for you, remember this; the better shape your engine is in (all things being equal) the better your Auto-Stick will perform. Due to its vacuum connections, the Auto-Stick is more sensitive to a well tuned engine than a manual.
Take a good hard look at your carburetor, especially around the area of your vacuum lead to the control valve. Look for any gas leaks; anything which might indicate a loss of vacuum at that point. Check your carburetor adjustment. Regap the points and plugs. Retime your engine. In short, make sure your engine is tuned up.

Do Know This
Although it adheres to the basic Volkswagen philosophy of good, sound transportation, the Auto-Stick transmission has been frowned upon by a number present-day VW fans. Changing Auto-Sticks over to manuals has spawned websites aimed at helping to accomplish this task. Yet the Auto-Stick itself is a reliable and functional transmission. Many of the parts, such as the case and gearing are actually built to the same high tolerances as the manual. If well maintained, the Auto-Stick will deliver many years of dependable and useful service. Most of the problems encountered by Auto-Stick owners can be handled by observing the procedures listed above in this article."


Good luck!

Mike

1970 AS Bug
ike

70 AS Bug

WolvenGoth

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
hey everyone! grinding question....
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2006, 12:38:56 PM »
wow, that's a lot to take in.  i just got the shifter apart and the contacts were dirty as...well...something really really dirty haha.  i'm gonna get them cleaned up and see if that helps, i hope it does, if not i'll go from there on your list, guess i need to order a clutch servo repair kit when it comes back in stock, and maybe some other stuff.

the atf fluid didn't really smell burned i don't think, don't remember for sure, i changed it a little bit ago, still red.  but in case it was, what would the "bad things to come" be?
-WolvenGoth

WolvenGoth

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
hey everyone! grinding question....
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2006, 01:36:30 PM »
ok cleaned the contacts don't know if it helped any or not but still grinds most of the time, sometimes it goes in gear.  how exactly do you reassemble the gearstick, i mean i figure like i took it apart but reversed, but is there a way to adjust it so the contact works properly, this site mentions that in adjusting the gearlever but doesn't really say how to do that part, just getting it lined up with L.  

also i noticed one of the big lines coming off of the...whatever it is in the top left of the engine compartment... was ripped.  i finished ripping the bit that was ripped, off, and am waiting on the engine to cool down enough to manuver my hands around in there and see where it goes and whatnot, i am gonna try just sticking it back on there now that the rip is gone, but i figure it should be replaced, but dunno what exactly it is, i guess a large vaccuum line maybe?  anyhow when the engine is cool i'm gonna see if i can trace where it goes, or if it disappears into nothingess through the firewall or something.  if anyone could take some pics of what this setup should look like, i'd really appreciate it.
-WolvenGoth

WolvenGoth

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
hey everyone! grinding question....
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2006, 02:13:44 PM »
ok after cuttin the tip of the ripped vac line and reattatching it, i dont' wanna jump to conclusions, but i went out there cranked her up and shifted through all the gears just fine.  i'll try it some more over the next couple days and keep you posted, now i gotta figure out how to replace all those lines, cause they look like they go into nothingness.  also, the hose is terribly rotted to begin with, but it is covered in some fuzzy beige kinda stuff... what would the possibilities of that being asbestos be?  i've heard there's some asbestos in the old bugs but don't know exactly where.  i'd really like to know if that could be it heh... thanks in advance!
-WolvenGoth

bookwus

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 339
    • Email
hey everyone! grinding question....
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2006, 08:00:38 PM »
Hiya Goth,

Responding to your posts in order....................

1.  Bad things to come?  Well burnt ATF can only get that way if the components the ATF lubricates build up excessive heat.  That means you could be looking at a bad torque converter and possibly a bad ATF pump.
Clutch servo repair kits are not that hard to locate.  Usually they run less than $30.  Basically, they are the internal rubber bladder and a new servo keeper ring.  Mid America which took over from RMMW should have them in stock.

2.  Reassembling the AS shifter lever is simply the reverse of taking it apart.  However, once it is reassmbled you will need to gap the shifter points.  That procedure is a little tricky, because it does NOT actually involve sticking a measuring blade between the points as one would in setting ignition points in a distributor.  A Bentley would be a big help here - it has pictures!  Basically you want to screw the sleeve down (gently) until the contacts are touching.  The (gently again) unscrew the sleeve .014 in. and tighten the upper locknut.
The vacuum lines you describe are coming from the control valve, so named because it controls your shifting.  Interesting, huh?  That you have a line that is ripped would certainly indicate a potential (um.....no), possible....(not right either), probable (yep!  that's it!) source of your crummy shifting.  By the way, while you were up in this area, did you notice the screw on the top of the control valve?  It's the adjusting screw (as in adjusting the shifting action) and it may (actually it should) be under a little plastic cap.  And for what it might be worth (quite a bit considering your description of the hoses so far), you should simply go through and replace ALL the vacuum hoses.  The big ones HAVE to be wire reinforced hoses - don't try to skimp on them.  I replaced mine with hosing from a local hydraulic supply house - strictly top notch stuff.
It's quite likely that the hose you noticed the rip in will lead you to the clutch servo or possibly the vacuum reservoir tank.

3.  Don't get crazy about the asbestos business.  There is none in the AutoStick that is not in the manual tranny.  The only asbestos that comes to my mind is in the tin assembly that the preheat tubes bolt into.  Maybe in the muffler tips?  Fixing that hose did seem to help, right?  Remember that your problems will usually be solved by attending to the vacuum and electrical shift systems.  My advice at this point is not to stop at this point because you seemed to have found the problem.  Redo ALL of the vacuum hosing (yes, new clamps too) and make sure your electrical connections are bright and shiney.

Hang in there!
ike

70 AS Bug

WolvenGoth

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
hey everyone! grinding question....
« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2006, 09:36:10 PM »
well the way i was told to flush the atf system was to let the return hose go into a bucket (which mine was too short so i duct taped a garden hose to it to extend it...btw duct tape doesn't hold up well to transmission fluid, also when it inevitibly spills out on the engine, it smells really bad when it gets hot enough to start smoking...but i think it's all burned off now) ... and let it drain about a quart and a half careful not to let it run dry then turn the engine off and fill it back up and repeat til it came out clean.  so since that worked i would figure the pump is working.  i'm kinda figuring a previous owner put some oil in there cause the cap says oil, not ATF, and that's why it was black...not sure tho.  

i got it back together but dunno if it is gapped right or not, i do know it works, as i drove it down the street and back a couple times, so i guess i have it pretty close.  

i plan on ordering proper replacement hoses for the big vac lines, volkenstein gave a link to some that he got so i'll probably get those.

the one that was ripped was the one closest to the front of the car.

i'm sure i need to get the connections shinier, but i did get em a good bit cleaner than they were, the big problem was that ripped vac line.  when i have money i'll get that line, and a bentley, but a timing light is the first thing on my list right now heh.  

you and volkenstein have been a huge help, my thanks to the both of you!

assuming everything continues as it is, i think all that's really left is the brakes, which i'm kinda scared of, i mean if i mess up an engine, i don't go anywhere, if i mess up the brakes, i dont' stop going somewhere i probably don't want to .. =\  but i'll figure it out, or save up for someone to do for me.  i found out about a guy who will come to your house and work on your ACVW for 50 an hour.  it'd be a couple hours i'm sure to do the brakes and grease the bearings, so that's the route i'll take if i feel uncomfortable when i get started... that and the alternator, which for all i know could just be a loose belt.  i checked charge at the battery and volts were only 12.29 so it's not charging but if you step on the gas it goes up slightly, so i guess it could be ok and just need a new, tighter belt.  it doesn't work like my fords do, so i gotta read up on how to adjust the belt and if needed how to replace the alt.

thanks again, without the samba and vwar, i'd probably still be looking at it, not running, in my driveway.
-WolvenGoth

volkenstein

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 273
    • Email
Contact gap adjustment in your stick & hoses.
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2006, 03:31:04 AM »
WolvenGoth,
                 To set it up OK do the following :

Undo the nut under the upper part of your stick a few turns.

Screw down the body (fingers, not with Stillsons :lol: ) until the upper stick "locks" against the contact. Try and wiggle it to check as the spring may be stiff and try and rotate the stick as well just in case.

Back off 1/2 turn. Now looking on your stick, is the slot aligned front to back or side to side?. If it is angled "/"  then undo it, like this "\" tighten, like this "-" undo until it aligns front to back. Undoing is preferable.

While holding the upper section steady, tighten the lower lock nut.

This will get you between .010 and .016 which is the recommended gap.

There's a second part for aligning the whole gearstick assembly, but if it shifts without problems let's skip that for now.

Big Hoses.

In a pinch, you can use 1/2" brake booster hose for the two short hoses on the control valve. They are the one from the inlet manifold to CV and the CV to reservoir tank. Looking at the engine, they are the first two hoses on the CV. The one near the firewall is a long one and runs to the clutch servo. The standard hose is 12mm ID.

In the thread "!!!" I listed a few other options as well but Belmetric seems to be the go and my hose was dispatched to my sister promptly.

Carby.
A good read for 34 Pict-3 adjustment is on www.vw-resource.com .
They do recommend that plugs, tappets & points are checked and set before you attempt any carby adjustment.  

Hopefully TopekaSuperBeetle will see this as well.

Enjoy
Volkenstein
1 Super RHD Semi-Auto "Klaus"

NOVA Ghia Owner

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 63
hey everyone! grinding question....
« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2006, 07:32:24 AM »
WolvenGoth:

I have a soft copy of an AS Repair/maintenance manual that I found somewhere on the internet - can't remember where now.

Anyway, PM me with your email address and I will send it to you.

I would be happy to contirbute this to the site if someone can tell me who to send it to.

Nova
quot;A just machine to make big decisions
Programmed by fellows with compassion and vision
We'll be clean when their work is done
We'll be eternally free yes and eternally young"
- Steely Dan

Schillnuts

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 9
hey everyone! grinding question....
« Reply #9 on: September 02, 2006, 01:25:49 AM »
I am also having a similar problem with my 73 AS Beetle.  Griding when trying to get into reverse and not being able to select any gear after starting the engine.  Vaccuum seems to be working fine, no cracked hoses and the car makes the sound when the ignition is turned to the on position.  The connection under the rear seat is fine, but one side of the terminal end is missing and I have no idea how that happened.  So perhaps all I need to do is to splice on a new terminal end and try that, or clean the contacts under the shift lever.  I can select all the gears when the car is off, which I am guessing means that there isnt anything mechanically wrong, but I could be wrong as this is the first time this problem has come up.  Looks like I will be in the garage this weekend trying to get my bug back on the road as I am not too enthused about driving a pontiac, but for the time being, I can earn my paycheck, so I cant complain.  Anywho, I will be going over what has been discussed on this thread and looking over the repair manual many times before I begin taking things apart.

I have a question for volkenstein, when you mentioned the position of the gear lever angle, which way is it positioned in the "/" way?  (is that angled toward the front or the back of the car, and what range/gear should that be in?  I will assume that the "\" position will be the opposite of "/", but I am unsure as to the orientation and would like to avoid as much unnecessary frustration from having to take loosen and tighten the lever multiple times before getting the alignment correct.

I look forward to using this wealth of info to fix my bug.  Ill keep you posted on whats going on (hopefully I dont mess things up any worse than they are now as there really arent any mechanics in my area who have the experience nor the knowledge of the AS beetle, but I would rather do the work myself...however, it would be nice to know of someone who could undo my mess should I really mess up).

Jason
**____***
**/ ____ \**
*(0\ U|U /0)*
     freak

volkenstein

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 273
    • Email
Position...
« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2006, 03:32:06 AM »
Schillnuts,
              Good to see you found your way here!

Re "/". The upper part of the gearstick is slotted more in one direction than the other. If you look down at the stick, hopefully this slot is aligned with the tunnel front to back.

I would sort out that bung terminal/connection pronto.



Regards
Volkenstein
1 Super RHD Semi-Auto "Klaus"

Schillnuts

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 9
hey everyone! grinding question....
« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2006, 10:56:24 AM »
Looks like the bad terminal end was not the solution to my AS woes.  Perhaps today will be the day where I begin to look into the contacts, after I check out fuse #15.
**____***
**/ ____ \**
*(0\ U|U /0)*
     freak

Schillnuts

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 9
Thank you for your help
« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2006, 10:06:19 AM »
Volkenstein, NOVA Ghia Owner, Wolvengoth, bookwus,

Just wanted to drop a line thanking you for your help in the shifting woes that I was having with my AS bug, which have since been fixed (about 2 months ago) but I have been forgetting to leave a note thanking you.  The culprit was a perforated servo gasket, which was definitely showing its age - very cracked with a few holes here and there.  Once that was replaced and the engine tuned, she ran like a dream.  Too bad its now December here in upstate NY and my bug is in storage.  Thanks again for your knowledge and assistance with helping me narrow down the problem of my AS shifting woes.

Jason
**____***
**/ ____ \**
*(0\ U|U /0)*
     freak

68AutoBug

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 422
    • http://community.webshots.com/user/vw68autobug
hey everyone! grinding question....
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2006, 07:45:10 PM »
Good to see You worked it out Jason...
thats the first control valve problem I can remember anyone having...
I have a spare control valve...
I just hope I never have to use it...
and it was good to see You fixed the control valve diaphram..


Most things on the Autostick are repairable, and easy to fix...
although some can take a bit of finding....
before You can fix them...
but replacing All the vacuum hoses is a good start...

cheers

Lee Noonan - 68AutoBug - Australia -

http://community.webshots.com/user/vw68autobug

ttp://community.webshots.com/user/vw68autobug
--- 68AutoBug  ---  Lee  ---  Australia ---
-- helping keep Air Cooled Volkswagen Automatics on the road -  Around the World --

volkenstein

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 273
    • Email
Good news
« Reply #14 on: December 06, 2006, 10:18:37 PM »
Schillnuts,
              Good to hear and thanks for posting back. Wish some others would do the same!

Regards
Volkenstein
1 Super RHD Semi-Auto "Klaus"