'68 Semi Auto

Started by FlamingChris, 21 September 2008, 14:48

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FlamingChris

Cheers, i hope i can find the cover plate amongst all of the bits!

FlamingChris

I've been looking at the engine today (no photo's as yet) but it appears that my flex plate is warped, where am i most likely to find myself another one?


68autobug



thats bad luck
the flexplates are rather fragile and i believe many get damaged when
they are being taken off to go to a manual clutch...
and no care is taken...

cheers

Lee

-- Helping keep Autostick beetles on the road --
   -1968 Silver metallic 1600 single port Beetle - with BOSCH  SVDA and new BROSOL H30/31 carburetor with GENIE Extractor exhaust system with a quiet thunderbird muffler

http://photobucket.com/68autobug

FlamingChris

Cheers guys, i've emailed the ebay seller to see if he'll ship it out to me.

My next quetsion is what method should i use to remove my bent flex plate as I've only removed a manual flywheel with the tool that grips into the starter motor teeth.  ???

Bookwus

Hiya Chris,

There are a couple of ways of preventing the flexplate from rotating while you apply force to the gland nut.

Remove a spark plug and insert a length of cotton rope into the combustion chamber.  Now apply your breaker and socket to the gland nut and apply force.  The gland nut (and the crank) will rotate until the piston compresses the rope in the combustion chamber.  The rope will prevent the piston from full travel thus locking it and the crank and the gland nut.  You should then be able to remove the gland nut.  I've tried this method and it works well.  Do be careful that both valves are closed when going this route.

Or........Have you noticed that holes in the flexplate (for the torque converter bolts) pretty much line up with the holes in the engine case on top and the studs in the engine case on the bottom?  You can manufacture tabs which bolt into the holes (or onto the studs) and bolt into the flexplate.  This will hold the flexplate in one position nicely.  But use as many (all four) as you can.  The flexplate is prone to warping if put under rotational stress from one or two positions only.
Mike

1970 AS Bug

68autobug

Quote from: Bookwus on 16 October 2008, 22:07
Hiya Chris,

There are a couple of ways of preventing the flexplate from rotating while you apply force to the gland nut.

Remove a spark plug and insert a length of cotton rope into the combustion chamber.  Now apply your breaker and socket to the gland nut and apply force.  The gland nut (and the crank) will rotate until the piston compresses the rope in the combustion chamber.  The rope will prevent the piston from full travel thus locking it and the crank and the gland nut.  You should then be able to remove the gland nut.  I've tried this method and it works well.  Do be careful that both valves are closed when going this route.

Or........Have you noticed that holes in the flexplate (for the torque converter bolts) pretty much line up with the holes in the engine case on top and the studs in the engine case on the bottom?  You can manufacture tabs which bolt into the holes (or onto the studs) and bolt into the flexplate.  This will hold the flexplate in one position nicely.  But use as many (all four) as you can.  The flexplate is prone to warping if put under rotational stress from one or two positions only.


that IS good information...

I couldn't work out any way to hold the flexplate apart from holding the crankshaft pulley
with a long piece of angle bolted to My nice alloy crankshaft pulley
which cracked under the strain....

and i thought and thought....  but thats all i could come up with...
I wasn't game enough to tackle the flexplate
in case I damaged it...
and you won't find that information in any book....lol

VW used a special number XXXX to hold the flex plate...

Lee



-- Helping keep Autostick beetles on the road --
   -1968 Silver metallic 1600 single port Beetle - with BOSCH  SVDA and new BROSOL H30/31 carburetor with GENIE Extractor exhaust system with a quiet thunderbird muffler

http://photobucket.com/68autobug

68autobug


Apologies for the size of the photo...
if anyone needs to see it larger
I can find the original photo

cheers

Lee
-- Helping keep Autostick beetles on the road --
   -1968 Silver metallic 1600 single port Beetle - with BOSCH  SVDA and new BROSOL H30/31 carburetor with GENIE Extractor exhaust system with a quiet thunderbird muffler

http://photobucket.com/68autobug

FlamingChris

Cheers, well i'm going to try to remove it today, i think that's whats causing the engine to bind as the bent flexplate is catching on the casing or i'll remove it and find it still binding and then have more stripping down to do.

FlamingChris

Bookwus you're a genius, that rope down the spark plug hole worked a treat!

Anyway we started to strip the engine down today which revealed to us that the engine dropped a valve and completely mullered the one of the pistons. We had a lot of trouble attempting to remove the crankshaft pulley which we still haven't managed to shift, any hints/tips??





Dropped Valve:



Remainder of the piston:



The culprit!:



Barrel:



How it's been left for today:


Bookwus

Hiya Chris,

Quote from: FlamingChris on 18 October 2008, 19:53 ..........We had a lot of trouble attempting to remove the crankshaft pulley which we still haven't managed to shift, any hints/tips?.......

Assuming that you do have the pulley nut removed, try this...................

Grab the biggest screwdriver you can find (the one I use for this has a 12 inch shaft) and a two pound sledge hammer.  Now move around and behind the pulley so that you are looking the "other side" of the pulley from about the position of the number 2 cylinder (the opposite side from the distributor).  The engine case on this side slants in toward the center on a diagonal.  This will allow you to place the screwdriver so that it contacts the pulley very close to its center.  Once you have contact a couple of good sharp raps should have that pulley off quick time.  This technique almost always works for me.  Should the pulley be fixed in place by rust or corrosion you'll probably need a puller to get it off.
Mike

1970 AS Bug

FlamingChris

I gave in and went out and bought myself a puller whihc did the trick in no time at all but then work came to an abrupt halt when we discovered this:







New case time methinks..

Bookwus

Hiya Chris,

I'd second that!

That crack looks as if it was caused by the shrapnel from your piston.
Mike

1970 AS Bug

72VDub

After seeing all that, and then finding the crank I would be tempted to pull the case apart to have a look see.

FlamingChris

Quote from: 72VDub on 19 October 2008, 23:15
After seeing all that, and then finding the crank I would be tempted to pull the case apart to have a look see.

Definitely, that's the new issue at the moment, we spent about an hour trying to split the case today but to no avail. I think it's tool shopping time again!